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Requirements

Environmental Science

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MAJOR

Environmental Science provides a scientific basis for management of earth systems. It focuses on the interaction between human activities, resources, and the environment. As human population grows and technology advances, pressures on earth's natural systems are becoming increasingly intense and complex. Environmental Science is an exciting field where science is used to best serve society.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MAJOR

Part A. The following four courses with labs:
EESC V2100 Earth's Environmental Systems: Climate
EESC V2200 Earth's Environmental Systems: Solid Earth
CHEM BC2001 General Chemistry I
BIOL BC1500 Introduction to Organismal and Evolutionary Biology
BIOL BC1501 Introductory Lab in Organismal and Evolutionary Biology

or EESC V2300 Earth's Environmental Systems: Life

Part B. Two other courses in chemistry, physics and/or biology

Part C. Two courses in calculus, statistics, data analysis, and/or economics

Part D.  Four elective courses (Workshop in Sustainable Development, EESC BC3300, recommended.)

Part E. Senior Research Seminar EESC BC3800x, 3801y provide credit for the senior thesis.

ADVICE FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL MAJOR

Students with a strong science background who are interested in majoring in Environmental Science are advised to take Earth's Environmental Systems: Climate (ENV V2100) followed by Earth's Environmental Systems: Solid Earth (ENV V2200). These two courses are required for all Environmental Science majors.

If you are interested in exploring Environmental Science or are concerned about your science background, you could take Environmental Science I (ENV BC1001x) in the fall. In the spring, you can decide to take Environmental Science II (ENV BC1002y) for non-majors, or shift into the major sequence of ENV V2100. Please note the following:

  • ENV BC1001x is not required for the major, but does count toward the major as an elective.
  • ENV BC1002y does not count toward the major.
  • ENV BC1001x must be taken before ENV BC1002y.

We recommend that Environmental Science majors take General Chemistry (CHEM BC 2001) and Introduction to Organismal and Evolutionary Biology, BIOL BC1500x (formerly BC2002x) plus the corresponding lab, BIOL BC1503 (formerly BIO BC 2003), early in their academic career at Barnard in order to prepare for upper level courses with prerequisites. Students with concerns about their science preparation should not take both at the same time. If you want advice on taking an Introductory Biology course, visit Biology, and for advice on taking an Introductory Physics course, visit Physics.

Students should check the catalogue and the department for additional information on the major, minor and courses offered by Barnard and Columbia. Classes with grades less than C- or taken pass/fail can not be counted towards the major.

See also Senior Research Seminar for information on senior thesis requirements.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MINOR

Students wishing to minor in Environmental Science must have a plan approved by the Environmental Science Department chair. Five courses are required including 2 laboratory science courses (such as EESC BC1001, EESC BC1002, EESC V2100, EESC V2200, EESC V2300) and 3 electives that form a coherent program. In some cases, courses in other sciences can be substituted with the approval of the chair.

Students wishing to minor in Environmental Science who are interested in field programs and seek minor credit must contact the department Chair, Stephanie Pfirman. The only current field program within Columbia University is SEE-U.

There is no minor in Environmental Biology or Environmental Policy.

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY MAJOR

Environmental Policy is a growing field at the intersection of science and society. Environmental Policy focuses on political institutions, societal processes, and individual choices that lead to environmental stress, the impact of environmental stress on institutions, processes and individuals, and the development of approaches to reduce environmental impact.

The Environmental Policy major is designed to equip students to play effective roles as citizens or career professionals who can actively engage in environmental decision-making and policy. Majors learn to analyze and evaluate environmental, political, and economic systems and public policies in the context of environmental concerns. The major begins with foundations in the natural sciences, social sciences, and quantitative analysis, followed by upper level electives in both the natural and social sciences. Student research at the junior level is required in Political Science, Anthropology or History, and at the senior level in Environmental Science. Many exciting opportunities for student research exist on this campus and in the greater metropolitan community.

Environmental Policy graduates go on to a variety of careers, including national and international environmental policy, law, economics, journalism, business, public administration, government agencies, corporations, multilateral institutions, nongovernmental organizations, academia, and consulting firms.

There is no minor in Environmental Policy.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY MAJOR

Part A.     Natural Science Foundation (4 courses)

Part B.     Quantitative Assessment (2 courses)

Part C.     Decision-making Foundation (3 courses)

Part D.     Natural Science Elective (1 course)

Part E.     Social Science Elective (1 course)

Part F.     Junior Research (1 course)

Part G.     Senior Research/Thesis (2 courses)

ADVICE FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY MAJOR

Advisers: Stephanie Pfirman (Environmental Science Department), Kimberly Marten (Political Science), Alan Dye (Economics), Paige West (Anthropology), David Weiman (Urban Studies).

Students with a strong science background who are interested in majoring in Environmental Policy are advised to take Earth's Environmental Systems: Climate (ENV V2100).

If you are interested in exploring Environmental Policy or are concerned about your science background, you could take Environmental Science I (ENV BC1001x) in the fall. In the spring, you can decide to take Environmental Science II (ENV BC1002y) for non-majors, or shift into the major sequence of ENV V2100. Please note the following:

  • ENV BC1001x and ENV BC1002y are not required for the major, but one can count toward the major as an elective.
  • ENV BC1001x must be taken before ENV BC1002y.

We recommend that Environmental Policy majors take General Chemistry (CHEM BC 2001) and Introduction to Organismal and Evolutionary Biology, BIOL BC1500x (formerly BC2002x) plus the corresponding lab, BIOL BC1501 (formerly BIO BC 2003), early in their academic career at Barnard in order to prepare for upper level courses with prerequisites. Students with concerns about their science preparation should not take both at the same time. If you want advice on taking an Introductory Biology course, visit Biology, and for advice on taking an Introductory Physics course, visit Physics.

Students should check the catalogue and the department for additional information on the major, minor and courses offered by Barnard and Columbia. Classes with grades less than C- or taken pass/fail can not be counted towards the major.

See also Senior Research Seminar for information on senior thesis requirements.