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Dance

310 Barnard Hall
212-854-2995
212-854-6943 (fax)
dance@barnard.edu
dance.barnard.edu
Administrative Assistant: Sandra Dos Santos

Chair: Mary Cochran (Artistic Director and Professor of Professional Practice)
Assistant Chair: Katie Glasner (Senior Associate)
Professor: Lynn Garafola
Associate Professor of Professional Practice: Colleen Thomas
Assistant Professor: Paul Scolieri
Adjunct Professor and Master Répétiteur: Allegra Kent
Adjunct Professor: Uttara Coorlawala
Adjunct Associate Professor: Mindy Aloff
Lecturers: Cynthia Anderson, Rebecca Bliss, Maguette Camara, Mary Carpenter, Tessa Chandler, Ori Flomin, Chisa Hidaka, Katiti King, Robert LaFosse, Jodi Melnick, Jeff Moen, Margaret Morrison, David Parker, Sabrina Pillars, Kathryn Sullivan, Ashley Tuttle, Caitlin Trainor, Karla Wolfangle, Bill Young
Artists in Residence: Nora Chipaumire, Faye Driscoll, Beth Gill, Francesca Harper, Heidi Henderson, Juliette Mapp, Reggie Wilson
Technical Director and Lighting Designer: Tricia Toliver
Musician Coordinator: Gilles Obermayer

The Department of Dance

Mission

The Barnard College Department of Dance, located in a world dance capital, offers an interdisciplinary program that integrates the study of dance within a liberal arts setting of intellectual and creative exploration. The major builds upon studio courses, the Department's productions at Miller Theater, New York Live Arts and other venues, as well as a rich array of dance studies courses, allowing students' creative work to develop in dialogue with critical inquiry into the history, culture, theory and forms of western and non-western performance, typically enhanced by study in other disciplines. Students work with accomplished artists whose work enriches contemporary American dance; they also study with outstanding research scholars. Making, thinking about, and writing about art are an essential part of the liberal arts education. For this reason the Department of Dance offers technique courses for students of all levels of expertise, while opening its other courses to majors and non-majors alike, who may also audition for its productions. The Department partners with cultural institutions in New York City to connect students with the professional world.

The Department of Dance is fully accredited and in good standing with the National Association of Schools of Dance.

Student Learning Outcomes for the Major and Minor

Students graduating with a major in Dance should be able to attain the following outcomes:

  • Apply critical thinking, reading, and writing skills to dance-related texts and choreography.
  • Develop the knowledge and research skills to explore the dance past in writing, orally, and in performance.
  • Present interpretations of dance-related texts both orally, in writing and in performance.
  • Apply library, archival, and internet research skills to dance scholarship and choreography.
  • Demonstrate improved efficiency and expressivity in dance technique.
  • Demonstrate growing technical understanding and fluency in dance technique.
  • Create original dances, dance/theater works or dance-based, mixed media works.
  • Collaborate with an artist in the creation of original dance works.
  • Participate in the creative process through the creation and interpretation of choreography.
  • Apply interdisciplinary research methods to dance scholarship and choreography.
  • Apply historical research methods to dance scholarship and choreography.
  • Demonstrate conceptual and methodological approaches for studying world dance forms through research and writing.
  • Demonstrate the ability to understand cultural and historical texts related to dance forms.
  • Apply anatomical knowledge to movement and movement concepts.
  • Evaluate the theoretical and artistic work of peers.
  • Communicate with an audience in oral presentations and dance performance.
  • Understand and interpret the language and form of an artist's choreography.
  • Solve technical problems in dance movement.
  • Apply musical knowledge to movement and choreography.
  • Design choreographic movement and structures.