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The Chinese in Cuba: From Bondage to Transnational Citizenship

Tuesday, February 4, 2014
6 PM
Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall
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Between the late-19th and early-20th centuries, Chinese migrants in the Spanish Caribbean colony of Cuba transitioned from indentured workers to free laborers. They formed families, communities, and businesses, and defended claims to citizenship and social standing within the emerging Cuban
 nation. Despite this rise toward citizenship, Chinese-Cubans were, like Chinese immigrants in the
 rest of the Americas, the targets
 of discriminatory legislation.
 They had to overcome racist
 laws that focused on sanitation and hygiene, morality, and unfair competition, and fight to become part of the Cuban national
 and cultural landscape while maintaining transnational ties to their distant homeland. Kathleen López is assistant professor in the department of Latino and Hispanic Caribbean studies and the department of history at Rutgers University. She is also the author of Chinese Cubans: A Transnational History. This event is co-sponsored with Columbia University’s Institute of Latin American Studies.

Sponsored by the Barnard Forum on Migration. For more information, visit barnard.edu/fom.

Feb. 04, 2014 - 6:00PM