Go to m.barnard.edu for the Mobile Barnard web app or download it from the App Store or Google Play.

On Human Bondage in Ancient Egypt

Thursday, March 28, 2013
12 PM
BCRW, 101 Barnard Hall
|

Around 1500 BCE, the subjects of this lecture first appear in the tombs of Egyptian nobles. Just a half-century before, the Egyptian Delta had been dominated by rulers from the north, but the Egyptians had since conquered their conquerors and exerted sway as far as the Euphrates River. The sudden appearance, activities, and gradual disappearance of a specific subset of people—who Ellen Morris argues were prisoners-of-war captured from Egypt’s most exotic and formidable contemporary foe—reveal much about the effects of imperialism on Egypt’s economy and sense of self. Ellen Morris joins Barnard’s faculty this year as an assistant professor of classics, whose scholarship on ancient Egyptian social history focuses on issues of divine kingship, sexuality and performance, state formation, and human sacrifice, along with life during periods of societal disruption. She is currently finishing her second book, Ancient Egyptian Imperialism.

 

Information
bcrw.barnard.edu

Mar 28 2013 - 12:00pm