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President Spar weights in on Nobel Prize for in vitro fertilization pioneer

 

For The Daily Beast, President Spar writes, "Yesterday, the 2010 Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to Robert G. Edwards of Great Britain, the scientist who developed in vitro fertilization. His work, which began in the 1950s, has resulted in the births of 4 million babies since 1978, when Louise Brown, now a mother herself, became the first life born of this groundbreaking therapy. IVF has fulfilled the dreams of countless hopeful parents stricken by infertility—couples, singles, gays, older women, cancer survivors—and extended nature’s narrow window of opportunity for women to enjoy both career and family. Dr. Edwards’ work has clearly led to massive joys for millions of individuals but, more quietly, it has also raised a host of issues that the U.S. refuses to grapple with, much less resolve."

"Generally if you are talking about "Ivy League eggs," we're talking anywhere between $10,000 to $25,000 per harvest," President Spar says on American Public Media's "Marketplace."