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Programs

In order to raise the profile of civic engagement at Barnard, NYCCEP works with a variety of initiatives geared towards involving students, faculty, staff, alumnae, and the community in the various aspects of the program. These initiatives incorporate a reflective component to create both experience and understanding of the issues at hand. 

  • Barnard Reach Out - New Students: The Barnard Reach Out program for new students (co-sponsored with the Office of Student Life and the Dean of Studies Office) places new students at various service agencies throughout the city during the first week of the Fall and Spring academic semesters.  These agencies include parks, shelters, soup kitchens, clothing pantries, and various advocacy organizations. Groups of students are led by faculty and administrator and student leaders who facilitate a post-event conversation about service and the particular site they visited. 
  • Barnard Reach Out - Current Students:  In addition to the Barnard Reach Out program for new students, NYCCEP also plans campus-wide community service projects for current Barnard students throughout the academic year.  For example, the Barnard Reach Out: MLK Day of Service program encourages current Barnard students to participate in community service projects on MLK day, and the Barnard Reach Out: Women History Month's "Women in Service" program celebrates the closing of Women's History Month.
  • Extended Barnard Reach Out:  This semester-long program brings together a group of 15-20 first-year and transfer students to serve, learn, and reflect together about a specific issue faced in New York City every week.  Students participate in service projects, site visits,  and seminar presentations about various civic engagement issues. 
  • Civic Engagement Fellowship Program:  Three to five Civic Engagement Fellows are selected each year to promote the New York City Civic Engagement Program in the Barnard community, to expand the College's community service endeavors, and to develop relationships between Barnard and community based organizations in New York City.
  • Public Interest Career Fair:  The Public Interest Career Fair provides Barnard College and Columbia University students with the opportunity to learn about internships, permanent jobs, and volunteer opportunities with local non-profit and governmental organizations.
  • Barnard Community Involved in Tutoring Youth (C.I.T.Y.):  The Barnard C.I.T.Y. program provides underserved and at-risk middle and high school students in the Morningside Heights, Harlem, and Washington Heights communities with the after school academic support they need to thrive and succeed in school.
  • America Reads/America Counts:  American Reads is a national initiative that challenges every American to help our elementary-aged students to read at grade level.  Building on the success of the America Reads Challenge, America Counts was initiated in order to improve student achievement in mathematics.  Barnard students serve as tutors in reading or math in local public schools and/or after school programs and are eligible to utilize their Federal Work Study awards for the program. 
  • Let's Get Ready:  The Let’s Get Ready program expands college access for low-income high school students by providing free SAT preparation and college admission counseling.  Barnard students serve as SAT coaches at the Goddard Riverside Community Center on the Upper West Side.  Find out more about Barnard's Let's Get Ready program here.
  • Alternative Break Program (ABP):  Offered in conjunction with Columbia University's Office of Civic Action and Engagement, the ABP is a student-led, and administrator-managed, program that provides programmatic and financial support for students' independent development and leadership of domestic or international service experiences over fall, spring, or summer breaks.
  • Theorizing Civic Engagement:  As part of this course’s syllabus, students are placed in not-for-profit or other community-advocacy internships and build upon those experiences through reading and discussion of relevant literature to create a stronger understanding of civic engagement in New York City.