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Locating MAC and IP Addresses

MAC Address

Other names: hardware address, adapter address, physical address

A Media Access Control address, or MAC address, is a code that is unique to the Network Interface Card (NIC) installed on your computer. Network cards (or built-in network adapters) in two different computers have two different MAC addresses, as would an Ethernet adapter and a wireless adapter in the same computer, and as would multiple network cards in a router. The MAC Address is a 12-digit alphanumberic (can include A-F) code divided into 6 pairs, e.g. 00:1a:2b:3c:4d:5e.

To find your MAC address, follow the instructions below according to your operating system. Make sure to look for a 12-digit code split as such: XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX.

  • For PCs (Windows 7)

 

 

 

  1. From the Start Menu, type Network and Sharing Center in the search box

  2. Under View your active networks, click on Wireless Network Connection (wireless) or Local Area Connection (ethernet)

  3. In the Wireless Network Connection Status or Local Area Connection Status window, click on Details...

  4. Look at the Physical Address

  • For PCs (Windows XP and Vista)

  1. From the Start Menu, choose Run

  2. Type command

  3. In the command line interface window, type ipconfig /all

  4. Look at the IP Address line under either Local Area Connection (ethernet) or Wireless Connection (wireless)

  • For Macs (OS 10.4/10.5/10.6)

 

 

 

  1. Apple Menu - select About this Mac

  2. Click on the More Info button

  3. Look in the System Profile tab, under Network Overview

  4. You will want to choose one or both of "Airport" (wireless) and "Ethernet" (ethernet) in the upper right list and then scroll down to "MAC Address" in the lower right window

 

IP Address

An Internet Protocol address, or IP address, is a numerical identifier assigned to devices on a network that allows the device to access the Internet. It is grouped as a set of 4 numbers divided by periods, e.g. 192.1.0.3.  Every time you connect to the network, either via ethernet or wireless, an IP address is assigned to your corresponding network card which allows it to connect. Having a working IP address is one sign (but not the definitive sign) that you are connected to the internet.

When you know that you are connected to the internet, you can google "my IP address" and easily find it. Or you can click here on the Columbia site.

  • For PCs (Windows 7)

  1. From the Start Menu, type Network and Sharing Center in the search box

  2. Under View your active networks, click on Wireless Network Connection (wireless) or Local Area Connection (ethernet)

  3. In the Wireless Network Connection Status or Local Area Connection Status window, click on Details...

  4. Look at the IPv4 Address line

  • For PCs (Windows XP and Vista)

  1. From the Start Menu, choose Run

  2. Type command

  3. In the command line interface window, type ipconfig /all

  4. Look at the Local Area Connection for your ethernet address and the Wireless Connection for your wireless address

  • For Macs (OS 10.4/10.5)

  1. Apple Menu - select About this Mac

  2. Click on the More Info button

  3. Look in the System Profile tab, under Network Overview on the IPv4 line. Be sure to select the appropriate "Active Service" in the top--Airport for wireless or Ethernet for ethernet